Starting seeds at Foster

The weather is finally beginning to cool off in Los Angeles but the daytime’s hot temps continue, leaving us urban farmers with a rather awkward planting season. Summer crops are beginning to die off and it’s still too hot to start autumn plants (root veggies and leafy greens). But this is a perfect opportunity to teach about the change of “seasons” in LA — hot and cold– and the plants that grow in each season.

We found a dead sunflower -- a good chance to introduce to the kids how seeds grow (from a plant first, before we plant them into the ground)!

We found a dead sunflower but it was a good chance to introduce to the kids how seeds grow (from a plant first, before we plant them into the ground)!

Afterwards, the students helped me to make seed tape - gluing seeds to paper towels or tissue paper. This method is a great way for kids to understand spacing with seeds and also keeps them from getting dirty just yet ;)

Afterwards, the students helped me to make seed tape – gluing seeds to paper towels or tissue paper. This method is a great way for kids to understand spacing with seeds and also keeps them from getting dirty just yet 😉

Soon we will be planting these seeds into the ground and watching these carrots grow! 🙂

Until then,
– Ranger Hope

Hope Cox

Native to Tennessee, Hope fell in love with urban farming while majoring in Nutrition/Dietetics at UT Chattanooga. She volunteered at an urban farm there for two years and gleaned (pun intended!) bushels of knowledge about harvesting & planting, CSA box coordination, farmers market stands, school field trips, farm-to-table and more. When Hope moved to Los Angeles in late 2014, she began volunteering with EnrichLA and soon after became a Ranger. She loves sharing with her elementary students the hands-on experience of gardening, finding bugs, composting and eating from the garden. The expression of glee on the students' faces when they discover a new critter or favorite vegetable is the best part of Hope's day! One day, she hopes to be a real farmer in the country but for now is glad to be learning the ins-and-outs of inner-city farming.