At Rio Vista the Seed is awake

Rio Vista

Rio Vista welcomed the fall. For today’s lesson we discovered the power of compost and how a seed grows!

We started learning about the process of composting, how compost is made, and what kind of organisms help it to break down into little pieces – the compost’s “ingredients”. We discovered that besides earthworms, bacteria and fungus play a really important role into this process. Water and air help us to discover that with the correct amount, we can make it work at a good speed or slow down the composting process. We also found and observed different kinds of compost in our garden. We discussed how we could improve some of them to get the best results.

Rio Vista

We also woke up a couple of seeds, with our magic story “A Seed is Sleepy”. We learned about the diversity of the garden’s seeds, the process they have to go through to grow healthy and strong, and of course which kinds of animals can be helpful to our garden and which kinds can be bad for our crops. Because the squirrels are the kings and queens of our garden, we watched them cutting and eating some sunflower pods. We discovered that it could be beneficial for some seeds to spread through propagation by being carried by some animals such as squirrels and birds.

Imagining and drawing was our last step of the day. We imagined we were all kinds of seeds (watermelon seeds, apple seeds, etc.) and went through fun yoga stretches to understand the process that takes a seed to grow.  After the fun stretching exercise we went right to drawing our creative seeds and what these seeds are going to become.

Every drawing was so fantastic!

Rio Vista Seed process,

 

 

Angeles McClure

Everything started at my grandma's kitchen back in Mexico. All that she cooked with fresh cut ingredients. I thought her skills were amazing but also have a people coming to our door selling local products like vegetables and fruit it really touched my life. I noticed the difference immediately as I moved to the city, where everything was more expensive and for a cheap meal you would something tasteless and low in nutrients. Missing my hometown I started to investigated about how I can produce food in a small space, how to save money doing this Technics . So everything lead me to a single thing: Urban farming and sustainable. I am still learning about his beautiful world and I am very happy to be sharing this knowledge and of course receiving new information, because we love this home called Planet.

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