Calvert – Become a Bee

IMG_20180309_105744824

Hello Garden Friends,

Today we all transformed into bees to help us understand hows bees work together for the benefit of the hive. First we walked around and looked for some bees doing work in the garden. And then we decided to turn into bees, using straws as our bee tongues and finding flowers represented by water cups.

I like to play this game to get the students to think like a bee. After the game we chat and analyze why they visited certain “flowers” more than others. Did some cups hold more water then others? Do you think some flowers have more nectar than others? Did you visit the closest cup to the hive? If you want to keep bees does it make sense to plant lots of flowers?

 

It took the younger 1st graders a little while to learn how to hold water in the straw by using your finger to make a seal on the top of the straw. But I taught them a method by having them repeat some simple steps. “Straw in, Finger on, Straw out, Finger off.”

Until next time!

Farmer Jeff

Jeff Mailes

Jeff Mailes is a garden designer and environmental educator working out of Woodland Hills, CA. A Los Angeles County Master Gardener and UC Davis Alumni, Jeff earned his B.S. in Environmental Resource Science in 2012 and has been growing edibles and natives for the past 6 years. Jeff's passion for plants and garden education has led him to school gardens from Los Angeles to Sacramento and all the way up to Portland, Oregon. Now familiar with ecosystems across the West Coast, Jeff has settled back home and works to bring people together over food and inspire the next generation of earth stewards to leave it better than they found it. When not writing about himself in the third person, Jeff enjoys singing with his guitar, going on camping and hiking excursions, and tossing a frisbee around with his friends.

Our Lush and Abundant Garden

The garden at Magnolia Ave is sprouting up some great colors. Check out the butterfly that came to visit!
Read More

Our Scholarly Best

Working hard in our Magnolia Avenue Elementary garden, using our scientific and artistic skills.
Read More

Our Lush and Beautiful Garden

  The garden at Hollywood Schoolhouse is super green! Though the end of the school year is here, the garden is still growing!
Read More

Garden Party!

Taking time to welcome family and staff guests to the garden and to teach them what we know. Plus, snacking. Yum!   Also, making sure our garden has good signage in as many languages as we speak at Melrose Avenue Elementary.
Read More

ReDuce! ReUse! ReCycle!

Using reusable containers to replant our Spider Plant babies. Then we use the fence to make it a vertical garden. Afterward we need to make sure to check the moisture of the dirt everyday and water when necessary so our baby plant roots can grow strong.   Plus, the general beauty and abundance of our…
Read More

Aspire Digs Into the World of the Roly-Poly!

Most kids know a lot about roly-poly’s; they’re cute, they roll up when they get scared and they don’t bite.  I wanted the kids to “dig a little deeper” into the world of a roly-poly, but first I gave the kids a little information about these bugs starting with their true name; pill bugs! So…
Read More

Holy Moly! Roly Polys at Woodlawn!

Most of us have held a Roly-poly before…that gentle little garden creature that rolls up into a ball when disturbed or scared. It’s an easy creature to like; they don’t bite, they tickle your hand when they crawl on you and they can protect themselves! Today in the garden, Kinder and 1st grade learned more…
Read More

Sharing is Caring

This week at St. Patrick’s the kids learned a lot about the precarious state that bees are in!  With 1/3 of our crops dependant on bees for pollination, we can’t afford to lose any more bees to flowerless landscapes, pesticides, or crop “food deserts”.   Bees depend on pollen for protein and nectar for carbohydrates…
Read More

Growing Fruit at Woodlawn

  The Woodlawn garden is in full production mode!  We have been harvesting lots of lettuce, Swiss chard, and collard greens in the past few weeks.  Just recently, the warmer temperatures have given our fruit-bearing plants the boost they needed!  Kindergarten and 1st grade searched the garden for fruit that was ready to harvest. We…
Read More

A Snail’s Trails at Aspire

I brought a little bit of the garden into the classroom on this rainy day. Fortunately, the rain and cloudy weather made it easy to find snails and slugs in the garden. In the classroom, I told the kindergarteners  that I brought with me a garden creature for them to observe.  We talked about the…
Read More

Bruschetta at Kingsley

By Justine Tyler | April 1, 2018

Bruschetta is an antipasto (starter dish) from Italy consisting of grilled bread rubbed with garlic and topped with olive oil and salt. The wonderful kids and I at Kingsley Elementary made this classic dish today. Bruschetta with Tomato and Basil Recipe Prep time: 15 minutesCook time: 20 minutesYield: Makes 24 small slices, serves 6-10 as an…

A plant is what?!

By Sarah Shutman | March 29, 2018

When teaching about gardening, it is impossible to engage students if they don’t know what part of a plant I am talking about! For this lesson, I covered the parts of a plant. I discussed the roots, stem, leaves, fruit and flowers. I brought in a dug up mallow plant (to show roots, stem, leaves),…

Beets are rad(ish)!

By Sarah Shutman | March 27, 2018

Beets are rad(ish)! This year, Valentine’s Day was full of nostalgic excitement, as I remembered my days of elementary school, full of sugary candy and a “holiday”. This was my first year teaching on Valentines Day, and I wanted to share something special with the students of 2nd  Street Elementary. I decided to do a…

That makes a plant?!

By Sarah Shutman | March 22, 2018

For this lesson, I planned to cover plant reproduction via parts of a flower. This was the first lesson that required thinking on my toes and adapting my plan (something that I am quickly learning). I drew out a picture and went over the descriptions. The pre-K and 2nd graders were  lost and distracted. They…

Love Nature

By PJ Johnson | April 12, 2018

Valentines Day at Gardener School Love Nature. We showed our love for nature at Gardener School. The students were allowed to pick the most interesting leaf in the garden from any place in the garden and they had  to write something to it like a poem or a love letter. Ms. Thaviphone class created leaf…

Gardener School – Composting

By PJ Johnson | April 11, 2018

2nd-grade class: We visited the three compost bins in the garden.  Finding Mr. Brown carbon examples and Mr. Green Nitrogen examples to put in the bins.  They gathered brown leaves from the ground and picked three things to identify which it was carbon or nitrogen.  We also looked at a compost thermometer, talking about the…

Pollination at Gardener Street Elementary School

By PJ Johnson | April 10, 2018

Talk to the class about pollination today.   The kids identified the stamen and pollen on the flowers in the garden.  They also took herbs from the garden lemon balm, mint, lavender, sage.  They also identified the pollen on some herb plants.

Van Ness Deep in the Dirt

By PJ Johnson | April 9, 2018

We cleaned up the beds and Ms. Chelsea and Udie pulled weeds together. The students in the VI part of Vaness got their hands deep in the dirt.  Pulling out weeds from the beds especially in areas where we have overgrown vegetation.  We have eaten a lot of Romain lettuce with Hummus because the kids…

Compost Learning at Van Ness School

By PJ Johnson | April 8, 2018

New group of kids learning about compost.  We took a poll as to what [a cup of worm castings] worm poop was just by looking, touching and smelling the worm castings.  The students really were interested in what they could put in the Darth Vader like compost bin

Van Ness School making seed bombs with the VI kids

By PJ Johnson | April 7, 2018

This was a great exercise for the kids especially Udie.  Chelsea the OT specialist at Vanes and I partner to play with our students at Vaness.  Udie also helped to crush roasted eggshells for the compost.