Posts by Tahereh Sheerazie

Breaking Bread

We grew Spelt, Sonora wheat and Buckwheat for our winter cover crops. Reaping our harvest and tasting the fruits of our labor. Buckwheat spelt and Sonora wheat bread, butter and buckwheat honey!  

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Tasting Pleasure!

A long process but so worth the wait. We planted Sonora wheat, Tibetan purple barley and Rye seeds in Oct – we’re eating bread and soup in May!  Eight months of postponing gratification, learning patience, respecting hard work, knowing soil, recognizing differences, understanding symbiotic relationships, working as a community, and tasting pure pleasure:-) ready for…

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April at El Sereno Middle school

From planting native black corn on earth day, to harvesting yellow and purple potatoes and sharing a spring harvest with teachers and students   and enjoying the slow but sure growth of our native cherry, and toyon berry bush, with ca poppies everywhere Hurray to spring!  

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Misty Spring day

Weeds everywhere greeted us on this drizzly Friday after spring break, as did tons of roses, juicy lettuce, and over five feet tall fava beans! Even our month old two foot tall Jujube tree has blosooms. The purple Tibetan barely nearly mature, while the Sonora wheat lush green. We observed how our cover cropped beds…

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gifts from a far away land

Months of ravaged planters are in full swing ! After a wonderful spring break, feasting on an over flowing spring garden is certainly a reward worth enjoying. We shared sweets from my travel to Pakistan, talked of common plants that grow on two sides of the globe, wrote and then shared how the sweets felt/looked/smelt/tasted,…

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springing forth at el sereno

          We came back to a burst of spring growth this week, from herbs in full bloom, fruits trees with tiny fruit, vegetables ready for harvest and the grains almost there. its a delight after months of patient work feeding the soil and learning the cycles of dormancy and growth.

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Celebrating Spring!

  Ancient cultures particularly native American and Iranian, celebrate the spring equinox with customs that date back to thousands of years. Last week before breaking for spring, we took a small peek at the traditional Iranian ‘Norooz’ with the spread of our own ‘Haft Seen’ (the seven seen’s or the letter S in farsi) a…

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Chia – Salvia Hispanica

  Our densely planted garden beds are all blooming with spring vigour Today’s lesson was an intro to a popular Aztec/Mexican ancient seed. Belonging to the Salvia family, Chia seeds are well known and more and more commonly eaten for their nutritional value. We first drew the tiny seeds in our garden journals, then got…

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Garden posters

Last week our beautiful garden posters got a good washing outdoors, so we decided to put up the rest indoors instead, for everyone to enjoy the garden without stepping a foot in it! Happy garden visitor. We planted a tray of California poppy seeds a little over a week back, and have already begun to…

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Nitrogen rich fava and grains plus a growing compost pile

As spring exhibits its vigor, so do the children. Adding to and turning compost piles, observing rapid growth and understanding how the earth comes back to life after the winters rest are all exciting times on a Friday morning. The first artichoke buds have bloomed. The year portends an abundant harvest. Meanwhile we’ve planted both…

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First fruit tree of the year – Ziziphus jujuba

Last week we dug through the incredibly rich top soil which the students created by sheet mulching in the fall. Six inches down we hit solid clay. Even so we planted the tough drought tolerant Jujube, donated by Sylmar High school’s garden program. A thorny deciduous small tree or shrub (Ziziphus jujuba) is native to…

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Corn, then and now

Teaching the children the significance and importance of corn in general and black corn in particular, we panted both hybridized golden corn and an heirloom black corn variety. An heirloom variety dating back to the 1860’s from South America Students will followup on today’s planting work with research about corn traditions and growing practices, then…

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Hugel mounds at El Sereno

As the Buckwheat grows and the apricot blossoms come alive, we have been working on building mini Hugel mounds at both ends of the garden. An excellent way to harvest water passively and make life simple in recycling our yard waste lanted with wild flower seeds, natives, some veggies and even a native cherry our…

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Hello Spring !

The first California poppy has popped its head The Ceanothus has survived all the balls that come flying from the playground The broccoli is loving the sun and mycelium laced oak mulch. Our garden is finally growing! Safe from prying hands, the Sonoran wheat is loving the sun, the garlic shoots are growing again,  the…

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